John Grisham is one of the most famous fiction authors of all-time. The former lawyer is famous for his legal thrillers, although he’s written quite a few great books that have never ended up in a courtroom.

What’s very notable about the Grisham books is that (with the exception of his recent Theodore Boone series) he’s never resorted to using the same characters. Every novel Grisham has written, save for his young teen novels, are purely standalone with no references to any of his previous books.

Grisham is a phenomenal author, with numerous of his books also made into movies. We have a list of all his books in publication order (which is also their chronological order) below:

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Publication Order of Jake Brigance Books

Publication Order of Mitch McDeere Books

Publication Order of Theodore Boone Books

Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer / Young Lawyer (2010)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Abduction (2010)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Accused (2012)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Activist (2013)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Fugitive (2015)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Scandal (2016)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Accomplice (2019)Description / Buy at Amazon.com

Publication Order of Camino Island Books

Publication Order of Rogue Lawyer Books

Publication Order of The Whistler Books

Witness to a Trial (2016)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Whistler (2016)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Judge's List (2021)Description / Buy at Amazon.com

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Publication Order of Short Stories/Novellas

Publication Order of Short Story Collections

Ford County (2008)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
Sparring Partners (2022)Description / Buy at Amazon.com

Publication Order of Non-Fiction Books

The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town (2006)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
Framed: Astonishing True Stories of Wrongful Convictions (With: Jim McCloskey) (2024)Description / Buy at Amazon.com

Publication Order of Anthologies

Legal Briefs(1998)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
The Wavedancer Benefit: A Tribute to Frank Muller(2002)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
Their World is Law(2002)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
Delta Blues(2009)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
Don't Quit Your Day Job: Acclaimed Authors and the Day Jobs They Quit(2010)Description / Buy at Amazon.com
Fourteen Days: An Unauthorized Gathering(2024)Description / Buy at Amazon.com

If You Like John Grisham Books, You’ll Love…

John Grisham Synopses: The Pelican Brief is a standalone novel by John Grisham. For Darby Shaw, it was merely a legal hypothesis, a daring speculation made in the dark. Yet, for the corridors of power in Washington, it ignited a political powder keg. In an abrupt turn of events, Darby becomes an inadvertent witness to a murder—a murder plotted against her. Forced into the shadows, she realizes she has only one ally she can rely on—an ambitious journalist seeking a scoop that could eclipse even the Watergate scandal. Together, they embark on a perilous journey to unravel a treacherous web of secrets.

With the landscape spanning from the enigmatic bayous of Louisiana to the inner sanctums of the White House, a sinister cover-up is being meticulously orchestrated. Someone has deciphered Darby’s legal hypothesis, and that someone is willing to go to any lengths to erase the evidence of an unimaginable crime. In a race against time, Darby and her journalist partner must navigate through a labyrinth of deception, facing dangers at every turn, in order to expose the truth and thwart a conspiracy that reaches the highest echelons of power.

The Client by John Grisham is a standalone title. At the tender age of eleven, Mark Sway and his younger sibling shared a clandestine moment, sneaking a forbidden cigarette. Little did Mark know that this minor transgression would intertwine his fate with a tormented lawyer on the brink of ending his own life. In an unexpected twist of events, Mark becomes the keeper of a bloody and explosive secret—an enigma that holds the key to the location of the most coveted deceased body in the entire nation.

Caught in the vortex of a justice system gone awry and pursued by a relentless mob hitman determined to erase any trace of his crime, Mark finds himself trapped between two ruthless forces. In this high-stakes battle, his only shield is Reggie Love, a woman whose legal experience spans just four years. As the prosecutors resort to extreme measures to force Mark’s revelation and the mob tightens its grip, Reggie embarks on a perilous mission to safeguard her client. Willing to challenge conventions and risk everything, Reggie employs a daring gamble in a last-ditch effort to secure Mark’s freedom, even if it means placing both their lives on the line. In a desperate race against time, Mark and Reggie confront an unforgiving world, fighting not only for justice but for their very survival.

In The Boys from Biloxi by John Grisham, throughout much of the past century, Biloxi basked in its reputation as a haven of sun-soaked beaches, charming resorts, and a thriving seafood industry. But beneath this idyllic façade lurked a shadowy underbelly. A sinister reputation for corruption and immorality festered, giving rise to a seedy realm of vices that encompassed gambling, prostitution, bootleg liquor, narcotics, and even contract killings. These illicit enterprises were masterminded by a tight-knit syndicate of mobsters, rumored to have deep ties to the enigmatic Dixie Mafia.

Two individuals, Keith Rudy and Hugh Malco, shared a unique bond as childhood friends and Little League standouts in 1960s Biloxi. However, their paths diverged as they approached their teenage years. Keith, son of a renowned prosecutor, embraced his father’s crusade to cleanse the Coast of criminality. In contrast, Hugh, son of the enigmatic “Boss” of Biloxi’s criminal underworld, was drawn to the nightlife and the shadowy dealings of his father’s clubs. As time progressed, Keith pursued a legal education and followed his father’s honorable path, while Hugh embraced the enigmatic allure of his father’s criminal empire.

As fate would have it, the destinies of the Rudy and Malco families were set on a collision course, hurtling towards a climactic confrontation that would play out in the heart of the courtroom. Keith and Hugh, childhood friends turned adversaries, would find themselves in a legal battle that epitomized the struggle between virtue and vice, justice and corruption, and the enduring clash between two families destined for an explosive reckoning.

Order of Books » Authors » Order of John Grisham Books

18 Responses to “Order of John Grisham Books”

  1. ronald smith: 2 weeks ago

    best of all time. has a way of putting one in the action.am retired sales. always need to produce a mental picture with words.no one in my opinion does it better than you.

    Reply

  2. Denis Maheux: 3 years ago

    Where does “Fetching Raymond” figure into Grisham’s order of books?

    Reply

    • Graeme: 3 years ago

      That’s just a short story from the Ford County short story collection.

      Reply

  3. Macster: 6 years ago

    Is the Witness to a Trial in hardback or just Kindle/audio?

    Reply

  4. Ron Cox: 6 years ago

    Grisham is a great story teller. Love to read his books. the Painted House and the Last Juror are just two of his great books that fly under the radar in my opinion. His presentation of the south is great to read

    Reply

  5. Bill Cox: 7 years ago

    When I try to print this order of books I get an error message (///c:Users/Dell/AppData/Local/Temp). I used to print these order of Authors all the time but now I Can’t???

    Reply

    • DealerDan: 7 years ago

      Sounds like an odd issue on your computer in regard to the temp directory. Maybe try cleaning out the temp directory or copying/pasting the list to MS Word.

      Reply

  6. Frank Skorrow: 8 years ago

    Has anyone else spotted the massive error concerning the value of 5 gold mini-bars on page 303 (large paperback edition) of John Grisham’s ‘The Racketeer’? It spoiled my enjoyment of an otherwise great book.

    Reply

  7. Stephen Richards: 10 years ago

    Which book title is about the man who takes a run every day only to get tortured at the end of each run before going back home?

    Reply

    • DealerDan: 10 years ago

      You might have it confused a bit – but I believe you’re talking about The Partner. The main character faked his own death and moved to Brazil and he’d go for a run every day, and on one of the runs he was captured and kidnapped and tortured. One of my favourites. Think I need to re-read that again.

      Reply

      • Stephen Richards: 10 years ago

        Thank you!

        Reply

      • Lavelle Smith: 10 years ago

        Don’t forget the girl-friend – the one that stole all his money. Women!!

        Reply

    • ddc4289: 9 years ago

      The Partner

      Reply

      • Stephen Richards: 8 years ago

        Someone hiding from me is verbally abusing me everywhere, like the shock torture treatments described in John Grisham’s The Partner.

        Reply

  8. the red pen lady: 11 years ago

    Whoever wrote this review(?) needs to check their grammar.
    I enjoy John Grisham….his novels are clean….not loaded with 4 letter words. More novelists should take note. The Theodore Boone series is fun…..I have recommended those books to some teenagers I know.

    Reply

  9. Eric: 11 years ago

    You are missing his non fiction novel “The Innocent Man”

    Reply

    • Brandon: 11 years ago

      Added. Thanks!

      Reply

  10. Graeme: 12 years ago

    I used to love John Grisham. The Client got me hooked. I can even remember what I was doing when reading his books – like when I was eating chips and curry sauce while reading The Firm from Saturday evening until 8am. Then I woke up, rented the movie and bought more chips and curry sauce. The King of Torts was probably his best book, but sadly the last one of his that’s worth reading. Since then, they’ve just all been downhill. It seems his books aren’t written to be engaging or entertaining anymore, just to deliver a political message.

    Reply

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